small house gone awry, in hollywood

Back in the 1920s, Buster Keaton was known for making and starring in many silent movies. His classic called One Week pays homage to small kit houses and shows what happens when you are unprepared to build one.

Newlyweds receive a house kit with building directions, and don’t look too thrilled at the work ahead. (Sales on Film)

Newlyweds receive a house kit with building directions, and don’t look too thrilled at the work ahead. (Sales on Film)

Buster Keaton and Sybil Seely gamely get to work, creating a house that’s a beautiful mess. Look at the ill-fitting roof, windows and porch construction. On the side of the house, notice the second-floor door leading to open air.

Wonder where we went wrong? the newlyweds take a look at their their topsy-turvy house construction. (Sales on Film)

Wonder where we went wrong? The newlyweds take a look at their topsy-turvy house construction. (Sales on Film)

In another twist, the couple discovers they built on the wrong property. Now the home must be relocated to their own land. Unfortunately, this relocation ends in disaster and the home is reduced to rubble.

Newlyweds start moving their home, which avoids one train but gets plowed down by a second one. (Sales on Film)

Newlyweds start moving their home, which avoids one train but gets plowed down by a second one. (Sales on Film)

Some house lessons learned:  Understand your limits. Get good plans. Know the materials used. Build on land you own. Find a builder. Beware of hurricanes. Same for trains.

Tiny and small houses make great comic fodder in the silent film era, and you must check out this classic.  See One Week on Fandor (paid stream) or Amazon (DVD set) — and prepare to laugh a lot.

linden house squeezes into yard

There’s nothing like watching a tiny house on wheels, while it’s getting gently squeezed into place. We spotted one Tumbleweed Linden moving from an original build site to a backyard, the other day.

Fortunately, this little house cleared some fences with nary a scratch. Here are several cell-phone, low quality snapshots recording the action.

Spotting one truck and one Linden home. (Tiny House Joy)

Spotting one truck and one Linden home. (Tiny House Joy)

Driver checks clearances before backing up. (Tiny House Joy)

Driver checks clearances before backing up. (Tiny House Joy)

Linden window reflects sky as it passes by. (Tiny House Joy)

Linden window reflects sky as it passes by. (Tiny House Joy)

Linden home may squeeze in here, after all. (Tiny House Joy)

Linden home may squeeze in here, after all. (Tiny House Joy)

Clear sailing of truck and home, into the yard.  (Tiny House Joy)

Clear sailing of truck and home, into the yard. (Tiny House Joy)

welcome to downsized joy

Over the past few years, there’s been an attraction to downsized and diminutive living spaces. Many reasons exist for this trend, including lifestyle goals. Doesn’t this bungalow beckon you?

Tiny House On Wheels

Relax in this Tumbleweed Linden bungalow, which is open, comfortable and has cooking and bathroom facilities. (tumbleweedhouses.com)

Yet today there’s a gap between what people want to do and their sense of whether it’s doable. Tiny homes are here to stay, whether built on wheels or foundations, and they answer needs for very nice living space!

We are going to help you figure how to start planning for one of these cuties, whether you buy it, have someone build it or, if so inclined, even build one.

Our tiny house joy extends beyond having a structure. It takes planning and ideas to figure out what to do with tiny spaces. They say a lot about you — and what’s important in your life too.