1945 homeless shelter, for $2.5 mm

Yes, a 1945 homeless shelter designed by architect Jean Prouve is available for $2.5 million. With two originals in existence, Gallerie Patrick Seguin priced the early pre-fab like a rare masterwork.

See this 689 square-foot structure get assembled, video here.

Prouve’s shelters were designed for homeless families, whose towns were destroyed during World War II. Surprisingly, they incorporate new construction techniques, materials and other flourishes. Let’s take a closer look at the exterior and interior of our house-for-sale.

Designed 60 years ago, the metal framing and natural wood cladding look modern today. Notice the large glass panels are slightly angled away from house, an interesting touch from architect Prouve. (Patrick Seguin)

Designed 60 years ago, the metal framing and natural wood cladding look modern today. Notice the large glass panels are slightly angled away from the house, an interesting touch from architect Prouve. (Patrick Seguin)

Welcome to the empty interior of the Prouve shelter. Bent steel is used for the load-bearing, axial portal frame system. The architect developed and patented this "demountable" approach in 1938. (Patrick Seguin)

Welcome to the empty interior of the Prouve shelter. Bent steel is used for the load-bearing, axial portal frame system. The architect developed and patented this “demountable” approach in 1938. (Patrick Seguin)

Now staged with a mid-century daybed, desk, chairs, side table and shelves, the Prouve place looks cool. As a post-war shelter, we imagine more spartan decor, sleeping quarters and a small kitchen too. (Patrick Seguin)

Now staged with a mid-century daybed, desk, chairs, side table and shelves, the Prouve place looks cool. As a post-war shelter, we imagine more spartan decor, sleeping quarters and a small kitchen too. (Patrick Seguin)

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