cool, small, wall-leaning furniture

We enjoy seeing surprising wall-leaning furniture as much as anyone. While these pieces may be great space savers, call us curious: Are they comfortable to use? What weight can they support? Do they, ugh, fall down easily?

Take a peek, along with our practical thumbs up/down judgment calls.

Thumbs-Up: Wall-leaning tables and desks

The wall-leaning Appunto table has pizazz, and should handle a computer or meal with aplomb. We also like how it folds straight down for storage. Let's applaud this French design for tiny and small living. (Laurent Corio, designer)

The wall-leaning Appunto table has pizazz, and should handle a computer or meal with aplomb. We also like how it folds straight down for storage. Let’s applaud this French design for tiny and small living. (Laurent Corio, designer)

A Lovebird consists of two wall-leaning desks which connect drawers to form a standalone table. It's a true multi-use solution for work and play. This Japanese design comes from a student completing her coursework. (Yuki Matsumoto, designer)

A Lovebird consists of two wall-leaning desks which connect drawers to form a standalone table. It’s a true multi-use solution for work and play. This Japanese design comes from a student completing her coursework. (Yuki Matsumoto, designer)

Thumbs-Up: Wall-leaning seating

Flip is designed to look as if it has been made from the tops of two chairs,

“Flip is designed to look as if it has been made from the tops of two chairs,” explains its British chair designer. The piece is a solid, practical wall-leaner which easily flips to reveal a higher or lower seat rise. (John Caswell, designer)

A small space winner designed in land-locked Switzerland, the Curt evokes a traditional shipdeck chair with a seat sling. It's obviously comfortable, has an anti-slip coating for safety, and may be easily stored. (Bernhard Burkard, designer)

A small space winner designed in land-locked Switzerland, the Curt evokes a traditional shipdeck chair with a seat sling. It’s obviously comfortable, has an anti-slip coating for safety, and may be easily stored. (Bernhard Burkard, designer)

Thumbs-Down: Wall-leaning tables and desks

This U.S. ladder-style piece looks handy with a computer desk and storage shelves to boot. It's only thumbs-down because you may find similarly-sized furniture with standard support instead. (Mastercraft LBI, designer)

This U.S. ladder-style piece looks handy with a computer desk and storage shelves to boot. It’s only thumbs-down because you may find similarly-sized furniture with standard support instead. (Mastercraft LBI, designer)

The Kaki is an all metal, round wall-leaner with a little bend to grab against the wall. It seems best-suited for an entry hall or side table. As a lightweight, this Japanese design is elegant though impractical -- unless you love it. (Kenyon Yeh)

The Kaki is an all metal, round wall-leaner with a little bend to grab against the wall. It seems best-suited for an entry hall or side table. As a lightweight, this Japanese design is elegant through impractical — unless you love it. (Kenyon Yeh)

Thumbs-Down: Wall-leaning seating

Does this Dutch piece work? An elegant bench holds at least two people, proving the physics of a wall-leaner. Still it suffers for beauty over comfort, and appears useful for short-term or secondary seating. (Izabela Boloz, designer)

Does this Dutch piece work? An elegant bench holds at least two people, proving the physics of a wall-leaner. Still it suffers for beauty over comfort, and appears useful for short-term or secondary seating. (Izabela Boloz, designer)

These Japanese “R Chairs” bat 1000 percent on sheer design dynamics and simplicity. However the cool chairs don’t seem practical unless you crave lots of temporary seating for guests. (Yuichi Takeuchi, designer)

These Japanese “R Chairs” bat 1000 percent on sheer design dynamics and simplicity. However the cool chairs don’t seem practical unless you crave lots of temporary seating for guests. (Yuichi Takeuchi, designer)

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